How Many Virtual Machines Can You Run at the Same Time?

How Many Virtual Machines Can You Run at the Same Time?

Every company is different, that goes without saying. Some companies, regardless of size are in need of various necessities within technology. For example, maybe you’re just getting started with cloud computing and you need to know the basics like how much data usage is included in your plan. Maybe, you’re an experienced user who just wants to learn more about the different pricing options available for specific tools. Maybe you’re even just curious about how many Virtual Machines (VMs) your company can run simultaneously.

Below, we will be diving deeper into what VMs are and how many your organization can run depending on the needs and circumstances of your company.

 

What is a VM?

A Virtual Machine (VM) is a software emulation of a computer that runs onto another computer. It allows you to host and run websites as well as applications on a remote server without purchasing or maintaining your hardware. A single VM can be used for many different purposes and may use one or more operating systems. You can scale up or down the number of VMs you use, saving you money in the long run if you don’t require all the initial VMs given. Cloud hosting providers may limit the number of VMs you can use on their platform or allow you to use as many as you need.

Understanding VM limits and how many VMs you can run simultaneously can help you in deciding which provider is best for you.

 

Understanding VM Limits

VM limits help cloud hosting providers to maintain reliability and security. Knowing what they are before you sign up for a particular plan is helpful when deciding which provider to go with. Most providers will tell you their VM limits before you make an account. VM limits are different for each cloud hosting provider, although some commonalities exist. For example, most providers include CPU, RAM, and storage when calculating a VM’s capacity.

Here’s a breakdown of some of their terminology:

  • CPU: This is the processor’s processing speed. The more capacity you have, the more VMs you can run at the same time. Common VM limits are 2, 4, and 8 CPU cores.
  • RAM: This is how much memory a VM has to store and run processes. If a VM has insufficient RAM, it may slow down or crash.
  • Storage: This is how much data the VM can store, such as website files and databases. The more storage a VM has, the more information it can hold.
  • Network: This is how much data a VM can send and receive. Standard VM limits are 1, 2, and 10 Gbps network bandwidth.

 

How Many Virtual Machines Can You Run at the Same Time?

 

Your-1-VM-QuestionIn general, you can run as many Virtual Machines at the same time as your computer can handle. The primary issue is how much RAM you have plus how much of it is available.

In any system, there must be a balance between available memory and the number of virtual machines you want to run. It is not advisable to overload your computer with too many VMs as it can cause a major slowdown to your system. This depends on your computer’s resources, but usually, you can keep an average of 3-5 VMs running simultaneously without seeing any performance degradation. Each VM uses about 500MB to a GB of RAM, so if your computer has 4GB of RAM or less, you should stay at around 2 VMs max.

Note that VMs share resources such as the same processor, RAM, and storage, so you may have trouble running multiple VMs simultaneously. If a VM is experiencing issues, it could slow down or crash other VMs held on the same computer.

 

Conclusion

You can save time and money by not purchasing or maintaining your hardware by just hosting and running your websites and applications on a remote server. The more capacity your RAM, CPU, and storage have, the more VMs you can run simultaneously; in other words, you can run as many VMs as your computer and plan will allow you, so long as you can handle the additional load.

We, at Protected Harbor, are an experienced partner with the knowledge and expertise to help you fulfill your goals. With managed hosting services from Protected Harbor, you don’t have to worry about the day-to-day management of your Virtual Machines or keeping up with the ever-changing technology landscape. Instead, you can focus on your business, knowing that you have a reliable partner to keep your Virtual Machines up to date and secure.

With our cutting-edge technology, you can be assured that your data is secure, your VMs are backed up, and your network is optimized to provide the best experience for all of your users. Our Virtual Machine hosting solutions come with flexible configuration options, allowing you to scale up or down as needed to accommodate any workload. Advanced tools will enable you to monitor your VMs remotely and receive detailed alerts if something goes wrong. You can also set up scheduled snapshots to keep a copy of your VMs in case of any emergency.

With our Virtual Machine hosting, you have the security and reliability of a managed service without the high costs and maintenance responsibilities.

Contact us today for a free demo and IT audit.

Are virtual servers more secured and protected than physical ones?

Are virtual servers more secure and protected than physical ones?

In 2022, cloud data centers will process 94 percent of all workloads. It will dominate the workload processing and supersede non-cloud data centers. Thus, if you’re planning to migrate to a cloud server, this article will assist you in your decision.

Are the physical servers a thing of the past? Not long ago, people feared a future of thronging data centers covering the globe. While that sounds exaggerated, spatial concerns have always been a critical part of any information center or server room. Owing to virtualization, the development of physical infrastructure slowed within the last decade.
As more organizations benefit from virtualization, virtual servers are already becoming a vital component of the modern hybrid ecosystem.

Businesses and service providers are choosing virtual servers over physical ones due to several advantages, including:

  • Reduced costs and overhead expenses
  • Better scalability as new virtual servers can be created as per need
  • Recovery and backup features for a fast and reliable restoration
  • Technical support from the virtual server hosting provider for setup and maintenance.
  • Ease of installing updates and software to several virtual servers

Is it true that virtual servers are less exposed to threats?

It’s not that virtual servers are less secure than the other servers. In many ways, virtual servers are more secure than physical servers because they depend upon a single-host server and are more isolated.
Each virtual server has its OS (operating system) and configuration, which may or may not be according to the benchmarks set by the parent company. Every one of these servers must be patched and maintained the same way other server does to keep up with the potential vulnerabilities.

The rise in virtualization has yielded a significant vulnerability. Gartner released a study that concluded that many servers being virtualized are less secure than their physical counterparts. So, using virtual servers has its benefits and leverages, but when security is concerned, at a minimum, organizations must have the same type of monitoring as physical systems.

Servers enable you to control and distribute the information and secure and protect the information. Servers can be distinguished into three main types:

  • Physical server
  • Virtual server
  • Cloud server

Physical server

These are the dedicated servers that use the standard components including processor, memory, hard drive, network, and operating system (OS) for running applications and programs, also called Traditional or ‘bare-metal servers. ‘ These servers are mostly single-tenant which means a single server is dedicated to a specific user.
The pros of having a physical server are that it is dedicated, unshared, and can be customized to serve a specific purpose. The obvious disadvantage is that it’s expensive and space required to set up the infrastructure.

Virtual server

A virtual server is like renting out space on a physical server off-site, similar to AWS. They have the same efficiency as a physical server but not the fundamental biological machinery. A virtual server is cost-efficient and provides faster resource management. Multiple virtual servers can be created from a physical server with a hypervisor or container engine.
Cost reduction, less operational expense, and scalability are the most significant benefits of server virtualization. The drawback, however, is that the upfront investments might be expensive for the software licenses and servers. Also, not all applications and servers are virtualization friendly.

Cloud server

A cloud server is a centralized server resource built, hosted, and delivered through a cloud computing platform over the internet and can be accessed on demand by multiple users. It can perform all the functions of a typical server, delivering storage and applications.
A cloud server may also be referred to as a virtual server or virtual private server.
Cloud servers provide ease of accessibility, flexibility, customization and are cost-efficient. While network dependency, security, and technical issues are some of the cons that a reliable data center management company can handle.

Physical vs. Virtual vs. Cloud servers, Which is right for your business?

Each type of server serves its purpose and delivers according to the business’s needs. Still, there are several factors to consider when deciding on the exemplary service for you: budget, performance requirements, data security, space, environmental control, workload, and data type.
As the world is rapidly moving toward the cloud- lifting all applications and information, larger enterprises are quickly leading the approach and virtualizing.

The past decisions to move servers into the cloud, either in virtual servers or colocation environments, become intelligent decisions for most companies. The primary benefits of switching to cloud servers are:

  • Affordability- since third-party providers manage cloud servers, it is far less expensive than owning your infrastructure.
  • Scalability– cloud servers respond quickly, scaling up and down to meet demand or any data storage needs.
  • Convenience– users can access the data from anywhere, anytime, and can be easily managed through a single API or control panel.
  • Reliability– since the cloud runs on numerous servers in a managed environment, service continues even if one component fails. It can efficiently deliver the same performance as a dedicated server.

But the reality is, even in today’s world, there is still a use of physical servers. And the decision-making should be done by considering the factors above.

Protected Harbor among the top virtual hosting companies

As a top virtual hosting company, Protected Harbor has accomplished exceptional reliability, stability, and durability with its Datacenter management service. Eliminating the causes of failures, we have achieved 99.99% uptime for our systems. We provide an unmatched service over any other provider with features like application outage avoidance (AOA), proactive monitoring, and technology improvement plan (TIP).
To know more about switching to a cloud server and the migration process, consult our experts; click here.

What Performs Best? Bare Metal Server vs Virtualization

What Performs Best? Bare Metal Server vs Virtualization

 

Virtualization technology has become a ubiquitous, end-to-end technology for data centers, edge computing installations, networks, storage and even endpoint desktop systems. However, admins and decision-makers should remember that each virtualization technique differs from the others. Bare-metal virtualization is clearly the preeminent technology for many IT goals, but host machine hypervisor technology works better for certain virtualization tasks.

By installing a hypervisor to abstract software from the underlying physical hardware, IT admins can increase the use of computing resources while supporting greater workload flexibility and resilience. Take a fresh look at the two classic virtualization approaches and examine the current state of both technologies

 

What is bare-metal virtualization?

Bare-metal virtualization installs a Type 1 hypervisor — a software layer that handles virtualization tasks — directly onto the hardware before the system installing any other OSes, drivers, or applications. Common hypervisors include VMware ESXi and Microsoft Hyper-V. Admins often refer to bare-metal hypervisors as the OSes of virtualization, though hypervisors aren’t Operating Systems in the traditional sense.

Once admins install a bare-metal hypervisor, that hypervisor can discover and virtualize the system’s available CPU, memory and other resources. The hypervisor creates a virtual image of the system’s resources, which it can then provision to create independent VMs. VMs are essentially individual groups of resources that run OSes and applications. The hypervisor manages the connection and translation between physical and virtual resources, so VMs and the software that they run only use virtualized resources.

Since virtualized resources and physical resources are inherently bound to each other, virtual resources are finite. This means the number of VMs a bare-metal hypervisor can create is contingent upon available resources. For example, if a server has 24 CPU cores and the hypervisor translates those physical CPU cores into 24 vCPUs, you can create any mix of VMs that use up to that total amount of vCPUs — e.g., 24 VMs with one vCPU each, 12 VMs with two vCPUs each and so on. Though a system could potentially share additional resources to create more VMs — a process known as oversubscription — this practice can lead to undesirable consequences.

Once the hypervisor creates a VM, it can configure the VM by installing an OS such as Windows Server 2019 and an application such as a database. Consequently, the critical characteristic of a bare-metal hypervisor and its VMs is that every VM remains completely isolated and independent of every other VM. This means that no VM within a system shares resources with or even has awareness of any other VM on that system.

Because a VM runs within a system’s memory, admins can save a fully configured and functional VM to a disk or physical servers, where they can then back up and reload the VM onto the same or other servers in the future, or duplicate it to invoke multiple instances of the same VM on other servers in a system.

 

 

Advantages and disadvantages of bare-metal virtualization

Virtualization is a mature and reliable technology; VMs provide powerful isolation and mobility. With bare-metal virtualization, every VM is logically isolated from every other VM, even when those VMs coexist on the same hardware. A single VM can neither directly share data with or disrupt the operation of other VMs nor access the memory content or traffic of other VMs. In addition, a fault or failure in one VM does not disrupt the operation of other VMs. In fact, the only real way for one VM to interact with another VM is to exchange traffic through the network as if each VM is its own separate server.

Bare-metal virtualization also supports live VM migration, which enables VMs to move from one virtualized system to another without halting VM operations. Live migration enables admins to easily balance server workloads or offload VMs from a server that requires maintenance, upgrades or replacements. Live migration also increases efficiency compared to manually reinstalling applications and copying data sets.

However, the hypervisor itself poses a potential single point of failure (SPOF) for a virtualized system. But virtualization technology is so mature and stable that modern hypervisors, such as VMware ESXi 7, notoriously lack such flaws and attack vectors. If a VM fails, the cause probably lies in that VM’s OS or application, rather than in the hypervisor

 

What is hosted virtualization?

Hosted virtualization offers many of the same characteristics and behaviors as bare-metal virtualization. The difference comes from how the system installs the hypervisor. In a hosted environment, the system installs the host OS prior to installing a suitable hypervisor — such as VMware Workstation, KVM or Oracle Virtual Box — atop that OS.

Once the system installs a hosted hypervisor, the hypervisor operates much like a bare-metal hypervisor. It discovers and virtualizes resources and then provisions those virtualized resources to create VMs. The hosted hypervisor and the host OS manage the connection between physical and virtual resources so that VMs — and the software that runs within them — only use those virtualized resources.

However, with hosted virtualization, the system can’t virtualize resources for the host OS or any applications installed on it, because those resources are already in use. This means that a hosted hypervisor can only create as many VMs as there are available resources, minus the physical resources the host OS requires.

The VMs the hypervisor creates can each receive guest operating systems and applications. In addition, every VM created under a hosted hypervisor is isolated from every other VM. Similar to bare-metal virtualization, VMs in a hosted system run in memory and the system can save or load them as disk files to protect, restore or duplicate the VM as desired.

Hosted hypervisors are most commonly used in endpoint systems, such as laptop and desktop PCs, to run two or more desktop environments, each with potentially different OSes. This can benefit business activities such as software development.

In spite of this, organizations use hosted virtualization less often because the presence of a host OS offers no benefits in terms of virtualization or VM performance. The host OS imposes an unnecessary layer of translation between the VMs and the underlying hardware. Inserting a common OS also poses a SPOF for the entire computer, meaning a fault in the host OS affects the hosted hypervisor and all of its VMs.

Although hosted hypervisors have fallen by the wayside for many enterprise tasks, the technology has found new life in container-based virtualization. Containers are a form of virtualization that relies on a container engine, such as Docker, LXC or Apache Mesos, as a hosted hypervisor. The container engine creates and manages virtual instances — the containers — that share the services of a common host OS such as Linux.

The crucial difference between hosted VMs and containers is that the system isolates VMs from each other, while containers directly use the same underlying OS kernel. This enables containers to consume fewer system resources compared to VMs. Additionally, containers can start up much faster and exist in far greater numbers than VMs, enabling for greater dynamic scalability for workloads that rely on micro service-type software architectures, as well as important enterprise services such as network load balancers.

Why Virtualization Should Be Considered?

Why Virtualization Should Be Considered?

Changing your IT environment to one that is Virtual allows you to instantly access nearly endless system resources that make for all-around optimal performance for your business. Virtualization also gets rid of potentially hazardous server rooms, cables, and bulky hardware; reducing overall IT costs as well as management expenditures.

First, let’s take a look at what Virtualization actually is.  Virtualization is the process of migrating physical systems into a virtual environment. Essentially, it is the creation of a virtual device, resource, or operating system. By providing a virtual view of your systems, this allows you to turn one server into a host for a group of servers that all share the same resources.

By concentrating your storage and systems on servers and installing virtual machines (VMs) to end-users, costs of your systems/infrastructure will be reduced while, management, security, uptime and control, will all be optimized and faster.

Often, many think of virtualization as the actual cloud, however, the cloud is just a piece of virtualization.  The most vital function of virtualization is the ability to run multiple operating systems and or applications on a single server.  In doing this, productivity can be achieved by fewer servers.  Overall, application performance will typically improve as a result of technology that balances resources and delivers what the end-user needs.

Virtualization is a solution for many organizations, however, it’s not for every business.  So how do you determine if this application is right for your environment?

  1. If your company relies on multiple servers and is using laptops and networks, virtualizing the environment will immediately reduce capital costs since there will no longer be the need to pay upfront for hardware.
  2. Virtual environments enable you to run multiple operating systems on the same hardware, hence increasing the flexibility of your infrastructure. Many businesses spend a ton of money on an extra room to store large server racks, wires and pay IT personnel to maintain everything. In this scenario, virtualization will help reduce hardware costs while freeing up room space that can be utilized for other things.
  3. Infrastructure environments that are virtualized allow for rapid and simple scaling – up or down. If your server needs more processing or memory, resources can be easily added.  The days of needing to physically add CPUs or RAM would be over because this concept is done with physical servers.
  4. Most maintenance tasks can be managed easily off-site and don’t require sending techs on site (another cost-saving feature). Also, the maintenance tasks can also be set up to run themselves across a variety of scenarios.

Why would you NOT virtualize?

If you run a very small business or a simple server scenario you might not need virtualization.  While virtualization will save you money, there are set up costs involved. Perhaps you are not prepared for those expenditures at your current juncture.  There is no point in virtualizing your systems if you can’t afford the tools and management systems required to support the technology.

Another reason would be if your software license does not allow you to run on virtual machines. It is always best to avoid anything that could breach your software license agreement, so be sure to check this before moving forward with virtualizing.

Protected Harbor delivers end to end IT solutions ranging from custom-designed systems, data center management, disaster recovery, ransomware protection, cloud services and more.  On average, we save clients up to 30% on IT costs while increasing their productivity, durability and sustainability.  Let our unique technology experts evaluate your current systems and design cost-effective, secure options.

If you are looking to learn more about virtualization solutions, contact Protected Harbor.  www.protectedharbor.com  845-573-1098

Disadvantages of AWS, Azure, and Other Big Brand Hosting

Disadvantages of AWS, Azure, and Other Big Brand Hosting

When it comes to hosting for a business, you don’t want to use just anyone. There are many critical factors to consider including security, stability, uptime, scalability, and more. Because of this, many businesses gravitate towards big, established brands for hosting and management such as Amazon’s AWS or Microsoft’s Azure.

Companies like these can likely provide well beyond your technical needs. That’s not to say they’re all the exact same. Azure caters to Microsoft products, allowing large companies to move their Windows-based infrastructure online more easily. Meanwhile, AWS boasts their general flexibility and universal capabilities.

Each brand has its unique strengths. When it comes to weaknesses, however, there are some overlapping issues that basically any large-scale hosting company deals with.

Overwhelming Options

Right from the start, many businesses are overwhelmed with the variety of packages and services offered by large hosting companies. AWS, for example, greets you with an entire library of services and products to choose from. Simply trying to find basic website hosting proves to be difficult and confusing.

Unclear Pricing Structures

Equally confusing are the pricing structures. Many companies try to sign you up on free trials or temporary discount pricing, only for you to discover the true inflated price months down the road.

These companies also tend to work off a pay-per-use model. In other words, the more data you process and store, the more your hosting costs. While it sounds nice in theory, as you only pay for what you use, it can make it very difficult to predict your monthly costs as prices fluctuate.

It also leaves you severely exposed to DDoS attacks.

DDoS attacks infect a large number of devices with malware and then use them to unleash a coordinated flood of traffic on an unsuspecting network. In addition to slowing down and (likely) crashing your systems, it results in a massage spike of data use.

The average size of a DDoS attack is 2.5 gigabits per second. If you’re being charged per data used, you’ll be left with a very large hosting bill following a DDoS attack.

Advanced Knowledge

Once you’ve figured out what your business needs, the real difficultly begins. Within any given service, there are countless add-ons, tools, settings, and more. While this provides a lot of flexibility and customization, it requires a lot of work and understanding. The deeper your needs go, the deeper your understanding needs to be.

Each platform is different, which means you either need to hire someone who is experienced on a particular platform, or you’ll need to invest in training a current employee. The question is, do you want someone learning a new platform as they’re managing your IT needs?

Support Problems

Platforms like AWS and Azure do offer their own technical support, should you require it. In fact, they often provide a certain amount of free support when you sign up. However, those hours can quickly be eaten up during the onboarding. After that, you’ll pay for support.

Things can get very expensive very quickly.

A better solution is generally to find a third party to help manage and maintain your hosting needs. This can provide more affordable support, but it also adds complexity to your hosting management and expenses.

A Simpler, Yet Powerful Hosting Solution

At Expedient Technology Services, we provide straightforward, yet diverse hosting solutions for businesses of all sizes. Whether you’re a start-up or an enterprise, we have the capabilities to meet your specific needs.

We operate under flat rate costs, so you know exactly what you’ll pay every month. We can even bundle in support hours so that you get professional assistance when you need it. As your company grows, we can easily scale our services with you.

While our initial costs may seem higher, they’re generally cheaper in the long run. Best of all, they’re much less stressful to understand and manage. After all, ETS exists to provide Stress-Free IT. For hosting, computer services, and technical support in Dayton, Ohio, and beyond, contact ETS today.